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Environment projects

Plastic Wise Moreland

We are committed to reducing single-use plastics in line with global concern about the impact plastic pollution has on our waterways, and marine environment. We developed a Plastic Wise Policy (DOC 87Kb) in April 2019. Its aim is to transition Council facilities, services and events away from single-use plastic, and to promote alternatives.

What single-use plastic items are included in the policy?
  • Single-use plastic cups, plates, bowls and cutlery
  • Plastic straws
  • Plastic and polystyrene take-away containers
  • Single-use plastic bottled drinks, where an alternative exists (e.g.cans)
  • Balloons and plastic bags
  • Single-use bottled water
  • Single-use disposable paper/coffee cups (you can apply for exemptions where needed, as no plastic-free single-use product currently exists)

 Plastic Wise Sports Clubs

  • Sports clubs within Moreland need to transition to the Policy by June 2022, eliminating targeted single-use plastic items.

    Initially clubs are being asked to make a voluntary pledge to become ‘Proudly Plastic Wise’. This means clubs will reduce and eliminate targeted single-use plastic items where possible. Council will work with clubs to develop action plans to start reducing plastic.

    The recent announcement of a State Government ban on 7 key single-use plastic items by 2023 will go a long way to helping Victorians move away from our reliance on many single-use plastic items. 

    Eliminating single-use plastic may seem challenging but there are simple changes your club can start to make. Council will then support clubs to implement some of the more complex changes.

    • Single-use plastic cups, plates, bowls and cutlery
    • Plastic straws
    • Plastic and polystyrene take-away containers
    • Single-use plastic bottled drinks, where an alternative exists (e.g.:cans)
    • Balloons and plastic bags
    • Single-use bottled water (we will support clubs transition)
    • Single-use disposable paper cups (we can provide exemptions where needed, as no plastic-free single-use product currently exists)
    • Don’t offer plastic straws, if you need them at all use paper straws
    • Sell reusable drink bottles or provide jugs of water at the bar or canteen, with reusable cups
    • Use paper plates instead of plastic, and use wooden cutlery or reduce waste by providing reusable crockery 
    • Transition plastic bottled soft drinks over to available alternatives, such as cans

Plastic Wise  Businesses

Learn more about Plastic Wise Businesses 

Plastic Wise Events and Festivals

  • Your support and leadership as an event organiser, stallholder, sponsor or volunteer is vital to reducing single-use plastics and litter.

    As part of the policy, exemptions can be made where there is no other practical alternative product or distribution method available. 

    Plastic Wise events and festivals info sheet (PDF 264Kb)

     

Achieving Zero Carbon in the Planning Scheme (ESD V2.0)

Achieving Zero Carbon within the Planning Scheme - ESD V2.0 aims to improve environmental planning outcomes within the municipality and support Moreland City Council’s Zero Carbon 2040 Framework and Action Plan.

This initiative aims to review, investigate and elevate the current requirements and ensure an effective transition for new development applications to support a zero carbon Moreland by 2040.

Find out more about Achieving Zero Carbon within the Planning Scheme - ESD V2.0

Cooling the Upfield Corridor

Responding to the impacts of the Urban Heat Island Effect (UHIE) is one of our emerging priorities. You can find out more about on our Climate change in Moreland page.

Our Urban Heat Island Effect Action Plan (2016 to 2026) showed the Upfield Corridor has some of the hottest surface temperatures in Moreland. The border of the Upfield Corridor has Merri Creek to the north, Barrow Street to the east, the Upfield Rail Line to the west, and Park Street to the south. The site stretches across Coburg and Brunswick.

To address this issue we created the Cooling the Upfield Corridor Action Plan (2018 to 2029). This aims to introduce water and landscaping to the Upfield Corridor. It also aims to reduce land surface temperatures and to improve amenity in public areas.

Delivering the Cooling the Upfield Corridor Action Plan

In April 2018 we opened community consultation about the Upfield Corridor Action Plan. This consultation period included two community consultation sessions and an online form. We closed consultation in May 2018.

We presented our councillors with the final draft of the Cooling the Upfield Corridor Action Plan (2018 to 2029) in October 2018. Council endorsed this plan.

Moonee Ponds Creek chain of ponds

Imagine the Moonee Ponds Creek as a natural waterway in lush green parkland instead of a drain.

We have endorsed this plan for the Moonee Ponds Creek with the Moonee Valley Council. The chain of ponds plan will turn the Moonee Ponds Creek into a vibrant destination. The creek will become healthy place that supports native plants and animals. It will also provide green space for recreation and prevent flooding.

  • Fifteen organisations signed a Memorandum of Understanding in October 2018. In this memorandum they all committed to the ‘Chain of Ponds Collaboration’. This was a historic new agreement that to help transform the Moonee Ponds Creek. The collaboration includes:

    • representatives from local and state government
    • community groups
    • not-for-profits
    • water authorities
    • research organisations

    It is in the interests of each of these organisations to improve the Moonee Ponds Creek.

    Key project dates

      • April 2019 to June 2020: Re-vegetation, access and drainage improvements at JP Fawkner in Oak Park
      • May 2019 to March 2020: Naturalisation Feasibility Study for Margaret Street to Herbert Street in Oak Park
      • June 2019: Access improvements at Bass Street in Pascoe Vale
      • April 2019 to Dec 2021: Recreational access and creek activation from Moreland Road to Hopetoun Avenue in Brunswick West
      • June 2020: The announcement of $5 million State Government funding for the naturalisation of the Moonee Ponds Creek
      • TBC: Next Chain of Ponds Collaboration meeting

    To find out more contacmooneeponds.creek@citywestwater.com.au or go to the Chain of Ponds Collaboration website. To speak to our team about this project, email openspace@moreland.vic.gov.au or contact Council on 9240 1111.

  • One of our key project priorities is the naturalisation of a section of the Moonee Ponds Creek. This area is next to Brosnan Crescent in Strathmore. It also covers a section between Herbert and Margaret Streets in Oak Park.

    Our consultants E2 Design Lab and Realm Studio created the final naturalisation report. It is now available to the public in the documents section on this page. This report includes the concept plans, cost-benefit analysis and business case. The report recommends a mix of naturalisation interventions. These interventions include:

    • some ponding
    • opportunities to connect with the waterway
    • improved path connections
    • elevated shared paths over the waterway
    • vegetation and concrete boring to stimulate successional naturalisation.

    The report shows positive social, environmental and economic results that can come from these works. It shows these potential results through a detailed cost benefit analysis. The estimate of the cost of delivering the project is between $6.5 and $8.5 million. Project partners are exploring an adjustable program of works. With an adjustable program we could deliver the works and maximise benefits. We could do this in line with funding opportunities.

    In June 2020 the State Government announced they will contribute $5 million to this project. We are working with all members of the Chain of Ponds Collaboration to take the next step in this plan. This next step will be from concept plan to implementation.

  • Work has already started on this plan, including:

    • recreational access and creek activation from Moreland Road to Hopetoun Avenue in Brunswick West
    • the naturalisation, feasibility study, and business case for Margaret Street to Herbert Street in Oak Park. For more on this read the Moonee Ponds Creek Naturalisation Report section.
    • re-vegetation, access and drainage improvements at JP Fawkner Reserve in Oak Park
    • access improvements at Bass Street in Pascoe Vale
    • re-vegetation works at Kernan Street in Pascoe Vale
    • access improvements at Esslement Reserve in Pascoe Vale
    • re-vegetation at Holbrook Reserve in Brunswick West
    • re-vegetation at Union Street Escarpment in Brunswick West

    To find out more contact mooneeponds.creek@citywestwater.com.au or go to the Chain of Ponds Collaboration website. To speak to our team about this project, email openspace@moreland.vic.gov.au or contact Council on 9240 1111.

    • April 2019 to June 2021: Recreational access and creek activation from Moreland Road to Hopetoun Avenue in Brunswick West
    • April 2019 to June 2020: Re-vegetation, access and drainage improvements at JP Fawkner in Oak Park
    • May 2019 to March 2020: Naturalisation Feasibility Study for Margaret Street to Herbert Street in Oak Park
    • June 2019: Access improvements at Bass Street in Pascoe Vale
    • June 2020: The announcement of $5 million State Government funding for the naturalisation of the Moonee Ponds Creek
    • TBC: Next Chain of Ponds Collaboration meeting

Street tree planting program

In 2017 we endorsed the Urban Forest Strategy 2017-27 (DOC 20Mb) to deliver practical measures that guide the sustainable planning, planting, management, resourcing and protection of vegetation across Moreland. The term urban forest refers to all the trees and other vegetation in public and private spaces. It includes things like street and park trees, front and backyard vegetation, grasslands, shrubs, wetlands, nature strips, balcony plants, and green roofs and walls.

The background work we did in preparation for this strategy has improved our understanding of the current urban forest, its challenges and identified opportunities for greening across the municipality. You can find out more about the issue of heat and how street tree planting can make a difference on our Urban Heat Island Effect (UHIE) page.

  • The key actions of the Urban Forest Strategy include:

    • Doubling canopy-cover across Moreland to 29% by 2050 to mitigate the impacts of heatwaves.
    • Improving the health and successful establishment of Council trees.
    • Protecting existing trees through improved planning and enforcement measures.
    • Working closely with community groups and residents to support greening initiatives while creating positive community attitudes towards the urban forest.
    • Continuing to plant canopy trees in our streets and parks to fill vacant sites and replace under-performing trees.
    • Improving tree health and cooling through the integration of Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD).

    Minchin, Guthrie and Cohuna Streets in Brunswick West have been identified as providing a great opportunity to mitigate the Urban Heat Island Effect (UHIE). Planting trees in these areas will also improve amenity and habitats. We have proposed planing trees in the middle of the road to avoid services like power, water, gas and sewers and to maximise tree canopy cover.

  • Trees on Council-owned land thrive best if they are valued and supported by the local community.

    Community custodianship of urban trees encourages the community to be more patient with tree growth. They also can fear fallen limbs less and consider autumn leaves and seed pods less problematic. For community custodianship to work well we still need to sustain and maintain our street tree assets.

    If you want to know more or have questions about our street tree planting program you can email info@moreland.vic.gov.au or call us on 8311 4300.